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not accept what happened from some of the citizens of the united states who offended the prophet mohammed-- peace be upon him. there was also somebody who wanted to burn the koran and this is something we do not accept at all. so the demonstrations were an expression of a high level of anger and a rejection of what is happening and the u.s. embassy represents the symbol of america as a people and government so people, the demonstrators, had a loud voice and as a government, it's our responsibility as the government of egypt we protected the embassy. we do not condone any attack against any embassies or any guests. this is a part of our principles and culture and what our religion orders us to do. >> rose: so the united states government and egyptian government are friends, not enemies? >> ( translated ): we are not enemies, of course. >> rose: you're our friends? >> ( translated ): for sure we are friends. >> rose: allies? >> the u.s. president said otherwise. >> rose: i know he did. but i'm asking the egyptian president. do you consider the united states an ally? >> ( translated ): this
the united states government and egyptian government are friends, not enemies? >> ( translated ): we are not enemies, of course. >> rose: you're our friends? >> ( translated ): for sure we are friends. >> rose: allies? >> the u.s. president said otherwise. >> rose: i know he did. but i'm asking the egyptian president. do you consider the united states an ally? >> ( translated ): this is depending on the definition of an ally. we have a real partnership in the interest and we want to achieve the interest of the world and to participate in many issues-- diplomatic, political, economical-- exchange of expertise in several areas. so the understanding of an ally as a part of a military alliance this is not existing right now. but if you mean by ally, partner and special diplomatic relationship and cooperation we are that ally. >> rose: president morsi for the hour. next. >> tonight a special edition of charlie rose. >> rose: mohamed morsi won an historic election this june to become the fifth president of egypt. he is the first civilian to hold this title. two years ago it would have been
to you. i wish to greet all of the wonderful people of the united states and all of the people who will see your program. at the end of the day, if you do have personal animosity towards me, don't transfer that on to the rest of the people of the united states. we love the people of the united states and they also wish in return peace and stability for all of the world. >> you've come here to make a speech to the united nations. many are saying it's the most important speech of your life. do you feel that? >> translator: no. this is not the most important speech of my life, but i do believe that every moment of a human being's life are the most important for that human being, because they will not come back. if you lose today, today's gone for good. one day of your life is gone. therefore, every moment counts, every moment is important. i have been coming to the united nations general assembly for eight years now, seeking progress and friendly relations with all nations, and the objective is still the same. >> the reason that people think it's so important is that they believe that
of the united states in our region encourages extremism. >> surprising. how would you feel if one of your children dated a jew? and heated. especially when i asked him about basic human rights for gays. >> do you really believe that someone is born homosexual? >> yes, i absolutely believe that. yes. >> i'm sorry. let me ask you this. do you believe that anyone has given birth through homosexuality? homosexuality ceases procreation. >>> good evening. welcome to a special edition of "piers morgan tonight." looking live at new york city, home of the united nations. world leaders from 193 countries are gathering for the annual meeting of the general assembly. president mahmoud ahmadinejad will address the meeting on wednesday. he had blistering words at israel today. more on that in a moment. he took aim at the security council on the subject of iran's nuclear program. >> translator: we have business that some members of the security council with little rights have chosen silence with regard to the nuclear warheads of the fake regime while at the same time they impede scientific progress of o
for the country. against perceived internal and external dangerous forces. israel, united states, first at the regime. vicious than enough of that over the decades and afterward he went from credence to that notion, that paranoia. so the syrian population made this bargain with the regime that they would give freedoms in return for stability and security, especially with the examples of instability in lebanon and iraq on their borders. and so, that was the mandate. that was legitimacy for the asides to rule. they lost that because of the policy and bashar al-assad unleashing the dogs in terms of cracking down the opposition. his policy in instability and insecurity. so he no longer has legitimacy. in a broader sense he is solid. whether he stays in power, he'll never have the mandate to rule again and legitimacy he once enjoyed. >> host: are western policymakers assuming his fall is inevitable? and should they? >> guest: that's interesting. i've been contacted by media outlets wanting a quarter to an obituary for about a year now. every time the call, i say it's premature because the re
is a big thing that iran knows and israel knows and the rest of the world knows that the united states is not going to let iran get a weapon or capability of getting a weapon. >> first of all, i think there's a balance. you need to strike a balance. what many including governor romney and congressman ryan and others around the world have said you have to be specific about this capability point. that you have to be able to signal to the iranians and the world that just building the weapon or getting close to building the weapon, is not the red line. having the tools at their disposal, that they would be easily assembled is a big problem and must be stopped because if they have the tools to assemble a weapon, easily assemble a weapon, it will have the impact that the iranian leadership wants. it will enable them to establish some set of region in the back their terror proxy operations through hezbollah and hamasimpum to just put pressure on friends and adversaries of ours and that's unacceptable and drawing that line does not mean you have to say at this specific moment at this specific
to millions suffering from hiv aids. second is to foster a substantial united states strategic interests. perhaps military or diplomatic or economic. third is another purpose and one that i think has to receive much more attention and higher priority. in a romney administration and that is aid that elevates people and brings about lasting change in communities and nations. here is an example. a lot of americans including myself are troubled by developments in the middle east. syria has witnessed the killing of tens of thousands of people. the presidents of egypt is a member of the muslim brotherhood. our ambassador to libya was assassinated in a terrorist attack. iran is moving toward nuclear weapons capability. we somehow feel we are at the mercy of events rather than shaping events. i am often asked why. what can we do about it? to ease the suffering and enter and the hate and violence? religious extremism is part of a problem but that is not the whole story. the population of the middle east is very young particularly in comparison to the population of the developed nations. typically
to anybody -- >> who? >> barack obama, the president of the united states. >> because romney did at a really opportune time. >> but he's going to all of these places, no time for netanyahu, but time for "the view," time for -- >> no time for netanyahu. >> that was good. >> i know. i know. >> wally from "leave it to beaver" was in that. >> was jerry mathers. >> no, that was the beave. >> asked about the newly released tax returns. >> all right. >> take a look. >> governor romney on "60 minutes" was asked, does he think it's fair that he pays a lower tax rate than somebody who is making $50,000 a year? and he said yes. i think it's fair and i also think that's the way you get economic growth. i've got a different vision about the way we grow an economy. i think you grow the economy from the middle out not from the top down. >> let me ask you, jon meacham, do you think the president was more presidential on the view or on "entertainment tonight"? >> i think "the view." >> clearly. love the view. >> there's this long tradition of this. remember -- >> fdr on "the view." >> fdr was actually on "in
solve every problem in the world, the united states has not and will not dictate the outcome of a democratic transitions. >> with strong feeling and a new era of democracy, it's not as if they can. the protests have made the middle east and issue only six weeks away. with accusations that president obama approach has been weak. president obama could still call upon the egyptian president and other authoritarian arab springs. the american president -- he is the first arab in a crisis. now they needed to address both and a new friend to put in it. in his speech, he defended his response to the arab uprising and looking past the elections to a nuclear installations, they warn that time is running out. >> it is not a talent that can be contained. it will threaten the elimination of israel and the stability of the global economy. it also triggers a nuclear arms race in the region. that is why a coalition of countries is holding government accountable. that is what the united states must do what we must do to prevent iran from obtaining a nuclear weapon. >> iran also says it doesn'
a minute. >> stay tuned. >> welcome back. in his address to the united nations general assembly, united states president barack obama said the recent unrest in the arab world would not prevent a march toward progress. many countries which sought dictatorships toppled has -- have struggled to establish civil institutions and democratic societies. >> recent protests against a u.s.-made and that-islamic film highlighted the debate these societies face over freedom of speech and religious tolerance. we met up with one artist in tunisia who is grateful for the freedoms that he now enjoys. >> he has been a cartoonist for 40 years. during that time, pen and paper have been his weapons in the fight against injustice and the struggle for change. he says the revolution in tunisia has given him new freedoms both personally and professionally. >> we only have freedom of expression in a few areas like sports, culture, or social issues. politics was taboo, regardless of whether the criticism was directed at public authorities or the government itself. we complied with those policies all those years u
Search Results 0 to 22 of about 23 (some duplicates have been removed)